101 Paracord Projects

101 Paracord Projects

There are hundreds of cool paracord projects floating around the prepper and survival community.

We’ve pulled together 101 of our favorite 550 paracord projects for you to get stuck into. There really is something for everyone in this article.

Whether you’re looking for lanyards or belts, survival bracelets or a keychain, heck we even have paracord dog collars and gun slings!

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Table of Contents

Section 1 – Paracord FAQ

Section 2 – Before You Get Started

Section 3Knots, Weaves & Braids

Section 4 – Pet Projects

Section 5 – Just For Fun

Section 6 – Survival Projects

Section 7 – Homelife Projects

Section 8 – Tools & Gear Projects

Section 9 – Weapon Projects

Section 10 – Clothing Projects

Section 11 – References

Paracord FAQ

First off lets take a look at some of the frequently asked questions above paracord. Specifically what it is, why it’s used and where it comes from.

What Is Paracord?

The main type of paracord used is known as 550 paracord, meaning it has been testing to hold a load bearing weight of up to 500lbs.

It’s internal makeup consists of 5 or 7 strands together with a nylon outer, this is what gives it its strength and durability.

550 Paracord Projects

Image courtesy Wikipedia

It’s typical use is for the suspension lines of parachutes. However today it is also used as an all purpose provision in many prepper and survivalist packs.

Different Types of Paracord

When buying cord for your projects, you should be aware of what you are looking for to make sure you buy the right stuff.

Since the paracord boom, there are many cheaper versions from China that have flooded the market. They are of lesser quality and often have not had their load strain tested adequately.

Therefore they could break under tension and when you need it most. To avoid making these mistakes, here’s some handy tips you can use to shop by:

Rule 1 – Make sure it has at least 7 strands, some even have 8. The 5 strand stuff is generally lower quality and obviously not as strong.

Rule 2 – Where is it coming from? I’m all about buying “Made in the US” products, the reality is however that most of our goods come from China due to the labour rates. Check the seller and look at their feedback if using auction sites or Amazon.

Rule 3 – Do they offer entire spools? If they only offer short lengths and you cannot buy a full spool of 100ft or more, chances are they are a middle man and upping their price by providing shorter lengths from a full spool they purchased wholesale.

If you follow these simple rules you should be just fine and happy with your purchase.

Which brings us onto…

Where to Buy Paracord

There are several options for purchasing the right kind of paracord.

  • You can try Ebay –  however that’s more of a pot luck option sometimes
  • You can go to Amazon – better results and less chance of buying the wrong cordage
  • You can use a well know supplier who we’ve personally used.

Here are our recommended suppliers:

Uses for Paracord

Both Military and civilians alike have taken to paracord due to its strength and unlimited uses. For example threading beads into a length of paracord to make a pacer or ranger bead is a great way of counting your paces and navigating in poor visibility.

Some more uses include replacing your watch strap with a paracord watch band, there are numerous paracord bracelet designs, including this one that includes a fire starter.

Then there are the less tactical, more fun project you can do, such as paracord dog toys, seat swings, and phone cases.

Next, we get down to the meaty end of paracord projects. Weapons.

These include monkey fists, kubotan’s, rock slings, and survival bow’s.

First up, let’s take a look at some of the various knot, weaves and braids.

Before You Get Started

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Below is a list of items you will need before you get started on your first project. This list is designed to help you prepare and plan beforehand…exactly what preppers do 🙂

  • Paracord Jig – This is the first thing I suggest you start with, see video below for instructions.
  • Scissors – make sure they’re nice and sharp, cloth scissors work great.
  • Lighter – this is used to seal the ends of cut paracord to stop it from fraying
  • Clips and Buckles – depending on your chosen paracord project, you will need something to hold the finished product together
  • Cutting Mat – this is crucial if you want to avoid destroying your furniture or kitchen counter
  • Stanley knife – any sharp blade of some sort will do

Making A Paracord Jig

Using a jig for your paracord projects is a really good idea. primarily it will save you a ton of time and if you’re anything like me when it comes to fiddly things I’m all fingers and thumbs.

This video shows you how to make your own paracord jig.

How To Fuse Paracord

Knowing how to fuse paracord ends together will save you a ton of time later on in your projects. This video shows you the best way to do it. Be sure to check out the Permalok Threading Needles further on.

101 Paracord Projects

SO lets kick off this 101 Paracord Projects marathon with taking a look at some Knots, Weaves and Braids. Further on we look at:

Table of Contents

Section 3Knots, Weaves & Braids

Section 4 – Pet Projects

Section 5 – Just For Fun

Section 6 – Survival Projects

Section 7 – Homelife Projects

Section 8 – Tools & Gear Projects

Section 9 – Weapon Projects

Section 10 – Clothing Projects

Section 11 – References

Paracord Knots, Weaves, and Braids

There are many different types of knots and weaves used in paracord projects, new designs are being revealed each week by those heavily involved in the hobby of making things using paracord.

The list below offers you some of the more commonly used knots, weaves, and braids:

(these are more for show than practical use!)

1) Centered Stitch Weave

Center Stich

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 1-2 hours

I really like this stitch design as it’s different to every other survival bracelet you see out there. Now the red cord is obviously not paracord buy you could use a strong dyneema or thin kevlar paracord to give the same effect.

2) Dragons Tongue

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 1-2 hours

This one certainly has teeth, in fact I would have named it “Dragon’s Teeth” weave if I had the choice! Using a mixture of 2 different color paracords can give some nice results.

3) Zipper Weave

Zipper Weave

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1-2 hours

Probably one of the neatest paracord bracelets you will see. This design is tightly woven with a clean fastener/buckle that doesn’t take away from the aesthetics. I would recommend you make a paracord jig to make this one.

It actually recommends that you soak your to allow it to shrink which makes measuring the correct length more accurate.

4) Nautical Bracelet

Nautical Weave

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1-2 hours

For all you water lovers out there, this design is super easy to make and again looks different to all the other survival bands you can buy.

Here’s a nice video and the instructable link above doesn’t do a great job of explaining exactly what is going on…plus he guts the paracord by removing the inner strands, rendering the cord useless in a survival situation!

5) Corkscrew Paracord Survival Bracelet

This braid also looks exactly as the name suggests. I different way of working with the paracord to achieve a different look and feel. Plus I would say this method would use less paracord.

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1-2 hours

Pet Projects

In 2012, 62% of American households has a pet. In the same year we spent over $50 billion on those pets! Since then those numbers have risen, so there’s a good chance you have a pet AND you understand how expensive they can be.

Making your own products, leashes, collars and toys can save you a ton of time. Plus they can stand up to the toughest of treatments!

Below we have a selection of cool paracord pet projects you can undertake and a couple of hours or less. They are practical and you will learn some great skills along the way.

6) Dog Slip Collar

In the closet I have a bag, it’s my GOOD Bag (Get Out Of Dodge) and I use it for middle of the night emergencies such as a house fire etc.

Hung on the outside is one of the paracord dog slip leashes. I prefer this type of leash to the regular clip leash for a number of reasons, the main one being it’s ease of use and speed to get on the dog.

When you’re in a hurry, you don’t want to be fumbling around with clips and collars.

Dog-Slip-Collar

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1-2 hours

7) Dog Toys

Dog’s love to bite and chew, they also love to play, no matter what age. What better way than to treat man’s best friend that to knock him up some paracord dog toys?
Paracord Dog Chew Toys

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 2+ hours

8) Dog Collar

For everyday use, my dog has a collar and clip on leash. However once we get away from main roads etc I take him off the lease and he’s free to roam.

Having one of these quick release collars allows me to take it off and on, without unclipping the leash. Plus its yet another emergency supply of 550 paracord when you need it. It could even double as a slip leash if needed by unraveling.

how-to-make-a-paracord-dog-collar

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1-2 hours

9) Dog Harness

Some dogs walk better on a harness, smaller dogs that can pull and damage their neck are suited to this style of harness. It would be a good idea to add some padding under the leg areas to avoid rubbing too much when they walk.

Paracord Dog HarnessParacord Dog Harness

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 2 hours

10) Halti Dog Collar

This is my favorite of all the pet projects. This Halti is similar to the one I used when training my Spaniel (who looks exactly like the one in the picture!) to walk on the lead to heel.

Halti Dog Collar

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1.5-2 hours

Just For Fun Projects

Who says paracord projects have to be all about survival and preparedness? What about the pratical side of these little DIY exercises?

The skills you can learn and the everyday items you can make when you simply have no other option is vital. Preventing boredness when SHTF will be a vital skill if you have kids (or your just a big kid yourself!)

Check out come of these projects for a mixture of household, cool, and downright practical items.

11) Paracord Grenade Keychain

They look cool and pack a nice amount of cordage for when you need it. Sure it won’t help you rappel down a rock face, but it can tie off a wound, replace broken boot laces or but used for lashing.

Paracord-Grenade-Keychain

Difficulty: 2/10

Time: 1 hour

Go to Project

12) Paracord Wallet

I really like this one and it had never occurred to me that you could make a wallet from paracord. I like the use of the 2 colors which really makes the wallet stand out.

Of course you could just use all black cord and make an uber tacticool looking wallet 🙂

Paracord-Wallet

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1-2 hours

13) Disposable Lighter Wrap

A little gimmicky but still has it’s uses. If you’ve ever handled a lighter with cold or wet hands, you know it can be tough. By wrapping it in paracord you add grip and increase the width so it’s no so fiddly anymore.

How_to_make_a_paracord_disposable_lighter_wrap

Difficulty: 2/10

Time: 1 hour or less

14) Keychain with Secret Compartment

This is a cool little project for your keychain and actually forms a part of my EDC (Every Day Carry) kit.

Rolled up tight, you can stick a couple of notes in there for emergencies and also slide a couple of fishing hooks and weights down the middle for if things really go South.

paracord-key-fob-with-hidden-compartment-26-600x384

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1.5 hours

15) Laptop Harness

This is practical for todays office worker and student alike. This paracord laptop harness packs in a lot of cordage and is a good started project as you will learn a few of the skills and knots required for bigger projects.

Paracord Laptop Harness

Difficulty: 7/10

Time: 2-3 hours

16) Paracord Army Men

Another fun one and something cool to add to your desk are these amy figures made from…you guessed it, PARACORD!

Paracord Army Men

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 1 hour

17) Steering Wheel Wrap

I have my everyday vehicle which is fairly new and great, BUT I love my old truck. Its a beast of a machine and has never let me down. The trouble is it’s getting tatty around the edges, ok more than tatty.

This steering wheel wrap will do the job to hide that and add an element of grip back to the wheel.

Paracord Steering Wheel Wrap

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 45-60minutes

18) Crochet Pen Holder

A practical household item which can sit on your desk out of the way unless needed. I would place this on in the “do this to prevent boredom in a SHTF event” category.

Paracord Crochet Pen Holder

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 2+ hours

19) Paracord Headband

A great one if you are a woman or have girls yourself. You can use any colors you like and the simple strand through the middle makes it look less military and more feminine.

Paracord Headband

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1-2 hours

20) Phone Pocket

I am forever dropping my phone or leaving it on my lap and then standing up for it to fall to the floor. I’ve broken countless phones and now I have a nice sturdy case.

Adding a paracord phone pocket is another level. Heck you could even add this to a Molle setup and have it on your check strap or shoulder straps.

Paracord Phone Pocket

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 1 hour

21) iPhone Sleeve

3)Again as above only this time a tight weave is used to create a blanket effect, perfect fro your smart phone or even to use as a possibles pouch.

I love the karabiner attachment also which means you can hook this to your pants or belt.

Paracord iphone Sleeve

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 1-2+ hours

Survival Projects

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Where would any Paracord roundup be without a section on paracord survival projects?

These projects are what initially attracted me to paracord, it wasn’t long before I understood just how practical some of these items can be. If you’re even in need of cordage, that paracord bracelet or keychain is no longer a fashion accessory, but a survival item.

22) Adjustable Survival Bracelet

This is a simple project that is within reach of beginners. It doesn’t require any special buckles or anything…that is because it uses a cobra weave bracelet. You can see the very detailed instruction from IntenseAngler on youtube below.

This is a great project for scouts.

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 1-2 hours

Go to Project

Survival Bracelet With Fire Starter

Having the ability to make fire in a survival situation can be the difference between life and death. This clever guy has come up with a way to carry that means of fire inside of a paracord survival bracelet

Difficulty: 7/10

Time: 1-2 hours

23) Survival Bracelet With Fire Starter #2

This one follows on from the above really, to give you a few different ideas so that you can create your own design that works for you and your situation.

I really like the use of the buckle and the firesteel here. Plus he’s even added a mini compass!

Difficulty: 7/10

Time: 1-2 hours

24) Quick Deploy Parafob

I have these Parafobs all over my backpacks, mainly on the zippers. The other place is on a few of my Nalgenes. Check out the video below from MeZillch’s YouTube channel.

MeZillch states this about his design:

My design is meant to be a utilitarian supply of EDC cordage, not a permanent keychain ornament, and because it is SUPER fast to both use and then re-store when done, I find it to be a much more convenient way to carry and store paracord, compared to a typical, woven “survival bracelet” which takes a lot more time. Although I carry it mostly for quick, day-to-day tasks, it’s also on hand for emergency/survival situations, and since no time-consuming weaving or unraveling is needed in its construction or deployment, it’s super easy to learn, use, and teach to others, such as onlookers who often seem impressed at how quickly you’ve gone from fob to rope.

Difficulty: 1/10

Time: Under 10 minutes

Go to Project

25) Survival Tin Pouch

Do you have a survival tin (like an Altoids can) to keep survival gear? If not, then you should think about it since they can fit almost anywhere.

Once you do that, then you can make this. Or, if you just want a cool way to store your mints.

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 30 – 60 minutes

26) Snare trap

This is a fast setup for a snare trap and will probably take you under 30 minutes to set up. Now, once you get the hang of it, you can set a trap in about 15 minutes.

That speed is important because you will need to set out several of these snare traps. Look for areas that are travel paths for your prey and put the traps there for the greatest chance of success.

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

 

27) Survival Fishing Bracelet

This is probably one of the better videos I have seen. He leans very heavily to the fishing side in his videos, but this is an ideal survival tool when you need to feed yourself out in the wilderness.

Difficulty: 7/10

Time: 2+ hours

Go to Project

28) Paracord Climbing Harness

This climbing harness can definitely be used if you are in a pinch…However, it looks to be pretty uncomfortable.

If you need a harness and you have about 15 feet of paracord, then this fits the bill.

Difficulty: 8/10

Time: 2+ hours

29) Survival Fishing Kit Bracelet

Having equipment that is adaptable for fishing is a great addition to any survival situation. If you don’t have the space to carry the kit outlined here then this is a good compromise. Brought to you by intenseangler and his youtube channel…

This plan calls for 550 cord, 7 strand which you should be familiar with by now. You also need 25 feet of fishing line, weights, and hooks. So technically you don’t have to have the fishing line and can use the inner strands of the paracord, you should have the fishing line if at all possible.

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

30) Paracord Sling

You can use this sling for a rifle and that is what Dale K. does in his explainer video below. It is a tad confusing at first but pretty straight forward once you get started.

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 1-2 hours

31) Emergency Firestarter Lanyard

Everyone knows you need fire if you are stranded, lost, or in any kind of survival scenario. Matt C outlines and demonstrates how easy it can be to make a simple lanyard.

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

32) Quick Deploy Bracelet

This quick deploy bracelet does exactly what it says in the title. It is designed to provide paracord when you need it, with zero cutting, just a few pulls and your done. A Perfect EDC item.

Paracord Quick Deploy Bracelet

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1 hour

33) Pocket paracord Dispenser

This dispenser is a really good idea for both the projects you are building and also for carrying with you or in your go-bag.

Depending on the size of container you choose you can pack a serious amount of cordage into one of these things. And, like the quick deploy bracelet above, it provides instant access when you need it most.

Paracord Pocket Dispenser

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

34) Paracord Duct Tape Keychain

I would hazard a guess and say that you have some kind of duct tape in your bug out bag or even in your EDC?

Well why not combine or first two loves? Paracord & Duct Tape to make this awesome little holder/survival item?

Paracord Duct Tape Keychain

Difficulty: 1/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

35) Paracord USB Bracelet

This is a step up from the regular survival bracelet and although it uses less cord (you could add more if you wanted), it’s very practical.

You should have all of your important documents, contact details and treasures memories stored away on several of these small USB devices. You can then keep it with you at all times by wrapping it in this survival bracelet.

Paracord USB Bracelet

Difficulty: 2/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

36) Paracord Fishing Lure

When I first say this I thought “Doh…why didn’t I think of that?”.

I mean it’s so simple to make, you could just knock them up on the fly when you needed them. In fact i would include some paracord in your survival fishing kit.

Paracord Fishing Lure

Difficulty: 1/10

Time: 10 minutes

37) Compass Bracelet

Another nice use of the survival bracelet, this time going all Rambo and adding a small compass. This one is great for wilderness adventures, I mean I’m not sure you would need this in an urban environment, but your never know.

Paracord Compass Bracelet

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 1 hour

38) Firesteel Wrap

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 30 Minutes

Home Life Projects

39) Paracord Koozie

This project uses a can of coke to demonstrate, however you could easily expand on this design and create a taller Koozie to hold your Nalgene bottles or military canteens.

Switch it up to suit your style and needs or just make a couple of fun one for the kids.

Paracord Can Koozie

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 1-2 hours

40) Double Monkey Fist Bookmark

The monkey fist, whilst used a weapon can also double up as a cool bookmark when scaled down in size. If you are thinking of making the larger version for self protection, this would be a good place to start and learn the knots required.

Double Paracord Monkey Fist

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 15 – 45 minutes

41) Hammock in a Nalgene Bottle

I love hammock camping, my first hammock was a simple net setup which was actually very comfortable, despite being very cheap. I have always thought about making my own hammock, and what could be easier than using paracord?

This tutorial looks a the hammock and also the bottle used to hold it. So not only can it carry water, it also holds your sleeping arrangements, combines with some climbing clips and a roll of Duct Tape.

Talk about multi-use items.

Paracord Hammock In Bottle

Difficulty: 7/10

Time: 1-2 hours

42) Paracord iPhone Cable Wrap

I’m not sure why you would want to do this, but at least one of the PrepperZine Team like this idea! I suppose its a god way to practice for other larger projects and it does make your cables look uber cool.

Paracord iPhone Cable Wrap

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 1 hour

43) Drawstring Bag

These kinds of bags are great if you are traveling long distances on foot. They allow you to carry any gear you need, however I prefer to add my wet gear to it.

Towels, clothing and my shelter etc. The design allows for plenty of air-flow which will help to dry your kit ready for it’s next use.

Paracord Drawstring pouch

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 30- 45 minutes

44) Permalok Threading Needles

Some of the projects you will encounter in this article require some nifty hand work and threading. Well these needles will make that a whole lot easier and they are also super easy to make.

Paracord Permalok Needles

Difficulty: 1/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

45) Paracord Trivets

Why not bring a but of color to your dinner table with these paracord trivets? They are a great rainy Sunday project and are good fun to make, so get the kids involved.

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 1-2 hours

46) Hammer Holder

I am terrible for putting a tool down and forgetting where I put it. Doing any repairs after SHTF will be hard enough without losing your tools.

These little paracord hooks will put an end to that and allow you to always have your tools handy by attaching them to your belt.

Paracord Hammer Holder

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1 hour

47) Pot Holder / Wrap

Another household project thats also practical. Pot holders made from paracord allow you to pickup pans without using oven gloves or a towel.

Paracord Pot Holder Handle

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 1 hour

48) Beer Bottle Holder

These are great for around the camp fire. This beer bottle holder offers a quick release buckle for when you are really thirsty!

Paracord Beer Bottle Holder

Difficulty: 1/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

49) Paracord Cross

If you are religious, this is a nice addition to your keychain and servers two purposes. It shows your faith and is also practical in an emergency. (use colors to your taste!)

Paracord Cross

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1 hour

50) ID Badge lanyard

If you have a survival/prepper group and have plans to band together when TSHTF then it could be a good idea to have each member carry an ID badge contains vital info.

Name, skills, Blood Type, pass codes etc. These paracord lanyards are just whats needed for those badges. Of course you could use it for everyday office use too!

Paracord Lanyard Strap

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

51) Paracord Camera Strap

Another practical project for an everyday item. This camera strap adds a little more stability to otherwise flimsy straps that come with the camera.

Paracord Camera Strap

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 1-2 hours

Tool and Gear Projects

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Now we find ourselves at the section that combines weapons and tools with awesome paracord projects that are downright practical.

There is something in this section for everyone, from gun slings to glasses holders, compression straps to snowshoes! If it’s a tool and it can be improved with paracord it’s here.

52) Paracord Bull Whip

This project is for a massive whip. It measures over 8 feet long, plus another foot for the cracker at the end.

That said, the bull whip will make Indiana Jones envious. It is not a good project for a beginner since it will take a very long time compared to some of the simpler projects.

Paracord Bull Whip

If you take this on, take your time. And also let me know in the comments!

Difficulty: 8/10

Time: 4+ hours depending on your skills.

53) Paracord Fast Rope

A paracord fast rope is a bundle of paracord that unspools very quickly when you need it to but still securely held together when you want it together.

This video goes through the steps of making one. All you need is some paracord and a couple of points to weave between.

Difficulty: 8/10

Time: 4+ hours depending on your skills.

54) Paracord Rifle Sling

The driver for designing this sling was the price of the paracord straps that are for sale online.

They are a little bit expensive…and you can make one for the cost of about 100 feet (or less) of paracord.

Don’t forget you need some swivels to attach to your rifle.

Paracord-Rifle-Sling

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 2+ hours

55) Backpack Straps

Considering this is the very first paracord project this guy has done, he did a great job on his alice pack. The straps are thinner and will lighten the load of your pack whilst provide some cordage should you need it.

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 2+ hours

56) Paracord Bottle Net

This is another great project for a beginner. It is basically a Nalgene Bottle holder and you can us it on anything about that size. I have one for a SIGG Bottle too.

Anyway, this should be a fairly quick paracording session.

Paracord-Bottle-Net

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

57) Neck Lanyard

Unlike the lanyard featured in the previous section, this one is made with a break free buckle which means that if you were to get snagged on something or someone was to pull it, it will pop apart and you can break free.

Unlimited uses, I like this one for a neck carry knife.

Paracord-Neck-Lanyard

Difficulty: 1/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

58) Sunglasses Lanyard

I’ve lost count of how many pairs of sunglasses I’ve broken by siting on them or crushing them in my pocket!

This lanyard is designed to keep them around your neck so you never lose or break them.

Paracord Sunglasses Lanyard

Difficulty: 1/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

Go to Project

59) Bundle Compression Strap & Handle

This image reminds be of an old army bedroll, when everything you need for a decent nights sleep in the outdoors is rolled up into a long thing roll.

This paracord compression strap is ideal for such a setup and also has a handle to make carrying easier. I vet they wish they had these back in the day!

Paracord Compression Bundle Strap

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1 hour

60) Paracord Snow Shoes

Depending on where you live, heavy snowfall may be likely for many of you. Even if you’re backpacking and get caught in a snow blizzard, being able to walk any kind of distance over snow will require snow shoes.

Of course you don’t need shop bought pieces of wood like in this tutorial, you could always use tree branches or whatever is to hand. A neat skill to learn to get you out of a tricky situation.

Paracord Snowshoes

Difficulty: 8/10

Time: 1-2 hours

61) Leatherman Pouch

The Leatherman tool is one of the most popular pocket tools on the market. There are so many of them that you will need to adjust the size of your pouch to suit, which is as simple as creating a template out of cardboard.

If you follow this tutorial, make sure you include the strap at the back for clipping to your belt or webbing.

Paracord Leatherman Pouch

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1-2 hours

62) Bow Sling

If you do any kind of bow hunting then you will know carry your bow over a long distance can be tiring…although we won’t admit it 🙂

This paracord wrist sling will help you to carry your bow with ease. It also looks pretty cool too despite the creator using wood stain to dye his leather??

Paracord Bow Sling

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

63) Water Bottle Harness

A simple yet effective project that can make carrying a water bottle easy.

There is also another use i have thought of for this and that is to use the harness to suspend the bottle under flowing water or a rain catchment system if you are stranded or in need of water fast.

Water Bottle Harness With Karabina

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 1 hour

64) Multitool Pouch

I always carry my small multitool on my car keys, and it does stick out like a sore thumb being stainless steel and shiny.

This little pouch will help to conceal the tool and it also looks really cool!

Paracord Multitool Pouch

Difficulty: 3/10

Time:1 hour

65) Paracord Bandoiler

Why buy a shop bought product when you can make your own? This paracord bandolier will carry your rounds (how many is up to you) for any weapon. It’s super simple to make too.

Paracord Bandolier

Difficulty: 2/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

66) Knife Handle Wrap

If you’re into knife making and you have any blanks lying around, this is a great project to practice making your own knife handle wraps.

The reason I love wrapping my tools in paracord is for 2 reasons.

1) It adds extra grip when cutting, swinging and carrying.

2) It is multi use in that I can remove it at anytime to use on another item.

Paracord Knife Handle Wrap

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

67) Axe Handle Wrap

As above, this time for an axe handle which does look even better than the knife I must say. If you leave some extra cord at the end you can also make a loop to strap the axe to your wrist and also lash it to the outside of your bug out bag.

Paracord Axe handle Wrap

Difficulty: 3/10

Time:1 hour

68) EDC Pouch

This is a neat little pouch for your EDC items. Depending on the size you make it you can sote all manner of items in here. From fire starting equipment, to a small fishing kit, even a torch and your “get home cash”.

Paracord EDC Pouch

Difficulty: 7/10

Time: 1-2 hours

69) Flashlight Wrap

I’ve done this project myself on my Mini Maglite and it does look great. It’s a simple weave to construct once you get started and there are a number of ways you can finish it off depending on your personal usage,

Paracord Flashlight Wrap

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

70) Nalgene Cap Paracord Fix

This is a cool paracord trick to ensure you never lose your nalgene bottle cap again. It make it easier to drink out of and quicker to take a drink on the go as you are not fumbling around with a cap in your hands.

Paracord Nalgene Bottle Cap Fix

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 45-60 minutes

71) Shotgun Sling

Personally I would have made this sling in black or camo color but that’s just my taste. This looks like a really well made shotgun sling and I can certainly see the benefits of it.

Whilst not very opsec, you can choose you own color based on your environment.

Paracord Shot Gun Sling

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 1-2 hours

72) Flashlight Carry Strap

This is a bit of novelty but can come in handy if you are carrying may items and need a quick grab handle for your torch. When investigating dark places it is easier to carry and rotate with the handle than by just holding the torch with your hand.

Paracord Flashlight Carry Handle Strap

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 1 hour

73) Quick Release Paracord Holder

If you pack a bundle of paracord in your bug out bag (if not you should be!) then keeping it neat and stopping it getting tangled is important.

This quick release paracord holder/compression strap will do just the job.

Quick Release Paracord Holder

Difficulty: 1/10

Time: 10  minutes

74) Paracord Snow Grips

In icy conditions you can whip up a set of snow grips with ease by using just paracord. I’ve not tried these out myself but I think I will come this winter as the rubber and metal ones I have are terrible!

Paracord Snow Ice Shoe Grips

Difficulty: 2/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

75) Paracord Donut

This is my preferred method for storing paracord in my pack. It doesn’t snag and it’s easy to store inside of the top pouch reach for when you need it.

I always take it with me when thru-hiking and I also keep a paracord donut in the truck. Simple and effective.

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: <10 minutes

76) Coiled Lanyard

This is a very unique paracord lanyard which gives you a good amount of cordage. It involves zero knotting and braiding and can be a nice break away from all of the finger twisting, cutting, snipping, fusing and melting.

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: <10 minutes

Go to Project

77) Cargo Zipline

I like this project for a number of reasons. The main one being if you are protecting a building or area and your firing position is rooftop based, then getting supplies etc can prove difficult.

Using the paracord pully system, you can transport goods back and forth without ever being seen.

Paracord Cargo Zip Line

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 60 minutes

78) Compression Sack

Similar to the bedroll compression strap earlier, this time for the modern sleeping bag. Stuff sacks are great, but what if you lose it?

What if you have a lot of gear and you back busts leaving you with nothing? Well you could pile it all into the bottom of your sleeping bag, zip it up and use this compression strap to tie it all together and sling it onto your back.

Paracord Compression Sack

Difficulty: 2/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

79) Ladder With Wooden Rungs

This is something you could either make on the fly in the woods or at home and use for emergency evacuation such as a fire ladder from the 1st floor etc.

paracord Rope Ladder

Difficulty: 1/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

80) Paracord Rope Ladder

This is a better ladder to make if you have enough paracord. It can be used for lots of things, even a kids treehouse.

It is so strong you will never have to worry about it breaking.

Paracord Only Rope Ladder

Difficulty: 9/10

Time: A Few Hours+

Weapon Projects

81) Paracord Slingshot

This is a great little weapon if you can follow the video. It’s difficult in parts, however if you watch the video a few times you will get the hang of it.

It’s not really that difficult, just the video makes it a bit tricky to follow along.

Difficulty: 7/10

Time: A Few Hours+

82) Self Defense Key Fob

This keyfob combines a small monkey fist which can be used as a self defense weapon should you need it. They are fairly unobtrusive and pack a lot of cord should you need it for something other than fending off an attacker.

Paracord Self Defense Key Fob

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 1-2 hours

83) Giant Monkey Fist

Now, this is where is gets interesting…A GIANT Monkey Fist weapon.

By using a heave object in the fist (like a pool ball) you can create a very destructive weapon from just a few lengths of paracord.

Giant Paracord Monkey Fist

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 1+ hours

84) Paracord Rock Sling

Another attack/defensive weapon comes in the form of this paracord rock sling. Keeping distance between yourself and your enemies is crucial and without a gun, this is the next best thing.

You can even hunt with this, however you will need some practice!

Paracord Rock Sling

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 1 hour

85) Hangmans Noose Knot

A little sombre I know, but you never do quite know when you will need such a device.

You’ve all seen the post apocalyptic movies where the new towns that have forms hang thieves and murderers buy a noose on entrance to the town as a warning to others?

Well, I guess that’s one way you could use it!

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

86) Paracord Kubotan With Screw

These Kubotan weapons are pretty deadly when used right. You can conceal them easily and whip them out when in need.

A great little project for an EDC weapon that is not a knife.

Difficulty: 7/10

Time: 1 hour

87) Paracord Nunchakus

Fancy yourself as a bit of a Bruce Lee? You should make yourself these paracord nunchakus! Let’s see the bad guys try and take you on when you start wielding these around in close quarters.

Paracord Nunchucks

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 1-2 hours

88) Paracord Blow Darts

A blow dart is a deadly and silent weapon that has been used by Ninja’s for centuries (yes Ninjas are real!).

If stealth is required you can’t go far wrong with these. They can be designed to stun, kill or even maim by using poison on the tips etc.

Paracord Blow Darts

Difficulty: 1/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

Clothing Projects

89) Paracord Watch Strap

I made one of these a few years back and it’s still going strong to this day. It’s been through snow and ice, swimming in the sea and the extreme heat of Morocco.

Seriously, make one, you won’t regret it.

Paracord Watch Strap

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 1 hour

90) Paracord Belt

A project I’ve been tempted by for a while. A quick release paracord belt that holds so much cordage has practically unlimited uses for it.

DIY Paracord Belt

Difficulty: 7/10

Time: 1-2 hours

91) Paracord Belt With Karabina

Here is another option for the paracord belt – this time using a Karabina as a buckle which further extends its use.

This one looks a little neater than the previous and the weave is closer meaning you can pack in yet more paracord.

Paracord Belt With Karabina Buckle

Difficulty: 7/10

Time: 1-2 hours

92) Zippo Lighter Pouch

I carry a lighter with me at all times and I suggest you do too. I don’t smoke but it’s always there when I need it.

Even walking home late one night and getting stopped by a group who asked for a light. They were drunk and a little in my face, but I pulled it out, lit their cigarette and walked off.

I have no idea of anything would have happened had I said “No sorry”, but I’m glad I didn’t have to find out.

Paracord Zippo Lighter Pouch

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 1 hour

93) Zipper Pulls

I always replace my zipper pulls with paracord ones. They never look this fancy and this is certainly a step up from just tying and melting the ends together like I do.

If you prefer the polished look, these are for you!

Paracord Zipper Pulls

Difficulty: 1/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

94) Wrist lanyard

This wrist lanyard can use used for any number of tools and is designed to keep you from losing a potentially life saving device.

You can make one and use it on whichever tool you have at the time. Priceless.

Paracord Wrist lanyard

Difficulty: 6/10

Time: 1 hours

95) Paracord Belt Clip

Belt clips are good for all of the other tools you need but are not using right now. They aid in carrying, plus, if you are to make the paracord belt from above, you will have a much stronger attachment point.

Paracord Belt Clip

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 30-45 minutes

96) Prussik Belt

Prussik knots are used in both climbing and tarp/hammock camping. They are extremely strong and yet easy to manoeuvre when needed.

The trick with this knot is that the cord actually tightens down on itself as a load is placed on it. There is know-where for it to go and you can then release the load and slide it back to loosen.

Paracord Prussik Belt

Difficulty: 5/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

97) Boonie Hat Wrap

Difficulty: 4/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

98) Neckerchief Slide

If you carry and Neckerchief then this cool little slide is for you. Of course, it also doubles as emergency cordage when you need it!

Obviously, this is a good project for scouts!

Paracord Neckerchief Slide

Difficulty: 2/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

99) Paracord Flip Flops

Emergency footwear at it’s finest. I’m not a huge fan on Flip Flops, but I can see they merits in hot weather and if you have no shoes for whatever reason.

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

100) Paracord Bootlaces

Difficulty: 3/10

Time: 15 – 30 minutes

Go to Project

101) 10 Clothing Related Uses For paracord

We leave you with this video on 10 different clothing uses for paracord. This video is both funny and informative and you will come away with some great ideas.

Difficulty: Mixed

Time: How Long is a piece of paracord?

Summary

So there you have it, 101 cool paracord projects, split into 10 sections, include a paracord FAQ and what you need before you get started.

I hope you enjoyed this article and that you will attempt your own chosen project soon.

If you do we’d love to hear about it in the comments below.

Disclaimer – PrepperZine is in no way responsible for your actions as a result of reading this article and taking part in the building of any of these projects. You agree to not inflict harm on any person from the use of the paracord weapons described. This projects are for educational purposes only.

Paracord Project References and Resources

CLICK HERE: FREE DOWNLOAD: GRAB A PDF VERSION OF THIS GUIDE

 

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About the author

'Mountain Man' John

'Mountain Man' John is a Survival and Preparedness enthusiast who loves everything outdoors. He has a passion for learning anything and everything to help sustain his and his families way of life post SHTF. He frequently shares his knowledge on a variety of topics from his hands on DIY projects, learning new skills such as hunting and trapping along with reviews on his Survival related purchases - Prepping has been in his family for generations, it's in his blood. You can follow John by subscribing to his newsletter on the PrepperZine.com homepage, or by following him on Facebook.

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9comments
Nena - 11 months ago

No chance of getting paracord around here, but I got around that hurdle by using maritime cordage instead. Not the old-fashioned hemp stuff, but the modern polypropylene kind, it’s great.

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Mav - 9 months ago

Number 88 took me to a blog on how to make paracord rope ladders instead of blow darts.

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Evan - 6 months ago

Just finished my first paracord donut! Took me three nights but once you get the hang of it, it’s easy. Now the hard part is fighting the urge to pull it apart…

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Jane Urbach - a few months ago

Might be nice to try some of the project when I an not at the computer. None of the several links to download the PDF worked. Guess it is not my day.

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